Idiomdles

freesocks


An Idiomdle is an idiom bundle. It is many words inside one word. Below you will find 7 idioms, or colorful sayings, in English. From each idiom, how many words can you make? For example, let’s take the idiom, “Knock your socks off ”. [It means to really impress someone with something you did. So you could say, “When I heard her speak English, it really knocked my socks off! She’s only been learning the language 4 months! How did she do it?”]  Inside the idiom KNOCK YOUR SOCKS OFF, we can quickly find these 10 words:  no, you, so, of, or, rock, our, cook, for, fry.

     Now you try !  (The meanings of the idioms are given below.)


1) OUT OF THE BLUE 

2) COOL AS A CUCUMBER 

3) LET THE CAT OUT OF THE BAG

4) DON’T LOOK A GIFT HORSE IN THE MOUTH

5) SLEEP LIKE A ROCK

6) SHOOT THE BREEZE

7) OUT OF THE WOODS

***

1) Out of the blue: something happens that you did not expect.  [It comes from looking at a clear blue sky and suddenly something appears, flying across the sky. USE: My boss came in today and said she was giving me a raise! It was totally out of the blue. It’s the last thing I expected.]  

2) Cool as a cucumber: someone who can stay very calm in any situation.  [It comes from the fact that even in very hot weather, the inside of cucumbers are about 20 degrees cooler than the outside air. USE: Most of the students were so nevous before their final exam. But Joe was cool as a cucumber.]

3) Let the cat out of the bag: to tell someone a secret.  [The phrase came from London in the 1700s. At that time, in street markets you bought baby pigs in a sack, or bag. Thieves would try to steal the pigs and put a cat (not as valuable as a pig) in merchants’ bags. USE: Peter accidentally let the cat out of the bag. Amy now knows about her surprise party.]

4) Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth: means don’t be ungrateful for a gift.  [It was something that was said over 400 years ago in England.  You can tell how old a horse is by looking at his teeth. Any horse was a valuable gift back then and so, if you were given a horse, it was considered to be very rude to open his mouth and look at his teeth. USE: “Mom gave me a pink i-phone, but I really wanted a purple one.” / “Stop complaining!  Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth!”]

5) Sleep like a rock: means to sleep very, very well. [It comes from the idea that large rocks don’t move and so, someone slept so well that he or she didn’t even more.  USE: I must have been really tired. I slept like a rock.]

6) Shoot the breeze: means to sit and chat, but not say anything of importance.  [It comes from the early 1900s in America when people would sit for a long time on their porches and just chat. Their words were sent into the breeze. Nothing of importance remained from the conversation.  USE: It was such a hot day. We didn’t feel like doing anything. We just sat on the porch all day shooting the breeze.]

7) Out of the woods: means that you’ve come through a difficult or dangerous situation.  [This phrase is said to have come from Benjamin Franklin. When America was full of woods it was very scary and dangerous to be lost in them. To get out of the woods was to find your way back to safety.  USE: My computer was totally messed up. I thought I lost everything. But it looks like the tech expert has been able to fix everything. I think we’re finally out of the woods.]

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