Alone together: a battle with words

padar


……….By Shaiq (from Afghanistan) and Andrei (from Ukraine). This was a real contest between the boys—both of whom worked very hard. Shaiq is in 9th grade and Andrei is in 10th.

Padar3

Prince E. Padar (Shaiq)

PrinceParadise

Prince E. Paradise (Andrei)


[PART ONE]

LONG ago there lived a Prince named E. Padar. He left home to look for a place with no problems. He traveled by camel, donkey and elephant. He sailed the oceans. He flew over mountains until, finally, he saw a sign that said:  Welcome to Paradise.  That is how Prince E. Padar found Paradise.

     The air was fresh and clean, the sky was a perfect shade of blue, and the clouds were close enough to eat. They tasted like vanilla ice cream. “This is the perfect place to live!” said the Prince. Then, suddenly, he had a thought (because he liked to think). He took out an eraser and removed the letters “r” and “d” from the welcome sign. He put a “d” where the “r” was and an “r” where the “d” was. The new sign said, Welcome to Padarise.  Suddenly he heard a voice say, “Ho, ho! Who is that changing my sign? Is this some April Fool’s joke?”

     Prince E. Padar checked his i-phone and said, “Right you are! Today is April 1st! But this is no joke. I’m the new Prince of Padarise!”

     “That may be,” said the someone who just arrived, “But this is Paradise.  I’m Prince E. Paradise . . . and you are just a sign painter!”

To make a long story short, Prince E. Padar and Prince E. Paradise agreed to have a contest. Whoever won the contest would be Prince and the other would be just a nice person. They found a funny old English teacher who lived under a pine tree and asked her for a contest. She gave them three. Whoever won two of the three contests, she said, would be Prince.

     “The first contest,” said the teacher under the pine tree, “is to see who can think up the most oxymorons.” 

     “Think up what?!” they both replied. 

     “You will have to work alone together,” she said. “No help from any frog princes! I will be waiting impatiently for your results.” 

     For a moment there was a deafening silence. The princes didn’t understand a thing.

     “Please,” they said, “Tell us what an oxymoron is!”

     “I just did! But you clearly misunderstood me. Good grief, how bitter sweet to be a teacher. This is one more failed attempt on my teaching record! Now do you understand?”

     The princes shook their heads, “No.”   

     The teacher sighed and said, “This is really the living end! I just gave you 9 examples!  I’ll have to ask my student teacher, Miss April Winter, to help us, or your contest will go over like a lead balloon!” 

     Both the princes started to laugh, thinking of a lead balloon. “Oh, that’s really funny.” But then they suddenly looked at each other and said, “Oh! We get it!  An  ox-e-MOR-on  is two words used together that are opposites!” With that, the first contest began. 

     A week later the princes returned with their answers and, as you can see, contest #1 ended in a tie: 

Prince E. Padar wrote:

speed limit

a little big

act naturally

only choice

found missing

working vacation

seriously funny

clearly confused

almost exactly


                                                      Prince E. Paradise wrote:

vacuum bomb

big sip

micro cosmos

pretty ugly

sad smile

bright night

sure guess

awfully good

material love

***

CONTEST #2:  

*Anagrams

mummy > 
the eyes > 
a gentleman > 
debit card > 
eleven plus two > 
hot water > 
vacation time > 
schoolmaster > 
dormitory > 
listen >

THE second contest,” said the English teacher, “is to see who can change my words into something I didn’t say. You will find that people do this all the time. So you should always know what someone really said—and not what someone said they said. Is that clear?” 

    “Not really.” 

     “O.K., then here’s an example. Once I told a friend that, while I was on safari in Africa, the elephant tracks we saw were really false prints. But my silly friend told people that we saw fleas sprint! And now, ethical sirs . . . is this clear

     “No problem!” answered Prince Padar.  

     “Noble romp!” replied Prince Paradise.  

     And contest #2 began—


Prince E. Padar wrote:                                                 Prince E. Paradise wrote:

the eyes  >  they see ………………………………………………..mummy  >  my mum
a gentleman  > elegant man …………………………………….the eyes  >  they see
debit card  > bad credit …………………………………………..a gentleman  >  elegant man
eleven plus two  > venue slept owl ………………………..    debit card  >  bad credit
hot water  > throw tea  ……………………………………….. eleven plus two  >  twelve plus one
vacation time  > activation me ……………………………… ..hot water  >  worth tea
schoolmaster  > coal smothers ………………………………..vacation time  > I am not active
dormitory  > dirty room, roomy dirt  ……………………  .. schoolmaster  >  the classroom
listen  > silent, lets in ……………………………………………. dormitory  >  dirty room

Prince E. Padar  >  Parade Prince ……………………… …...listen  >  silent
smart  > Mrs. At …………………………………………………….my favorite books > a fury books motive
love  > vole …………………………………………………………...do something > demo hosting
act  > cat ……………………………………………………………… my favorite cats > tomcats fear ivy
art  > rat ……………………………………………………………… the birthday cake > the baked charity
tend  > dent …………………………………………………………. his best friend > behind strifes
money  > my one ………………………………………………….. pine tree > ripe teen
Afghanistan  > Afghan satin

Rome  >  more
now  > own, won
someone > see moon


Padar3

Prince E. Padar (Shaiq)


* After an incredibly close contest, Prince E. Padar won Contest #2. But now you will have to wait impatiently until next month to find out who won Contest #3 and became Prince. In the mean time, try to write some oxymorons and anagrams yourself!

 ©InterestEng. July 2013  §  The stories in the magazine portion of the site are written by English language learners. Stories are corrected by a native English speaker.  § Photos are staff or used with permission.  §  To contact us:  go.gently.on@gmail.com