A child’s view of Ramadan

This year Ramadan is from June 28th - July 28th.


Iris reflection

InterestEng.photo


WE call this month the month that we are all “the guests of God”: the doors of God open to everyone to come find mercy [forgiveness and not punishment; love and not hate].  So we also call this month, “God’s Mercy Month of Plenty”. It is the month that God gave the Prophet Mohamad the Holy Koran. During Ramadan, we try to make our hearts clean. This month we should be careful about all things.  We should not say lies. We should not do bad things to other people.  We should not even look at them with mean or unkind eyes. It is a way to start a new life of doing good. During Ramadan we fast.  It means we do not eat or drink from sunrise to sunset. We will be hungry and we will be thirsty so that we will understand better the suffering of poor people. We understand how hard a life they have, so that during this time we help them. We also remember our friends who died and we ask God to forgive their wrongs.       

     At the end of Ramadan we have Eid. When it is Eid everyone is happy—and sad too. We are happy because it is Eid and we worked hard to be free from bad things and we have more peace with others who we were not happy with. But we are sad because Ramadan is over. One day before Eid people cook special things and we take them to our neighbors. We also remember the poor people and take food to them.  From every home one small child will bring something to us and we will take food we cook to other houses. Our plates will be full from giving and from getting. When we give food we say, “May God forgive all who have died and all living people.” 

    There is one more thing I want to say.  There are three nights near the end of Ramadan when all families go to the mosque and pray all night.  They do not sleep.  They pray all night.  If there are people who cannot go, then they pray all night in their homes.  So to end, I want to say that Ramadan is the best month. It has so many benefits. — Frozan

—Frozan speaks Dari, Pashto and English.  She studies at SOLA, School of Leadership in Afghanistan. She dreams of being an astronaut. “At night I talk to the stars. I tell them my dreams. They are my best friends. I want to be an astronaut because I want to know with whom I am speaking.”

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 ©InterestEng. July 2013  §  The stories in the magazine portion of the site are written by English language learners. Stories are corrected by a native English speaker.  § Photos are staff or used with permission.  §  To contact us:  go.gently.on@gmail.com